How To Get Help

You know you’re in trouble when you’re:

  • Afraid of your partners explosive temper
  • Being hit kicked, choked, or shoved. Have had objects thrown at you.
  • Being subjected to verbal abuse, name calling, or constant criticism.
  • Being threatened with violence towards yourself or someone else, or suicide.
  • Being watched, followed, checked-up on, stalked or called constantly.
  • Becoming isolated from friends and family.
  • Restricted by your partner’s excessive jealousy and possessiveness.
  • Afraid of saying no to sex.

Plan for your safety:

  • CONTACT a domestic violence program and stay in touch as you plan for safety.
  • PACK A BAG with money, keys, copies of important papers, a change of clothes and anything you or your children would need in an emergency. Place it in a safe, hidden place that you can access quickly if you need to leave in a hurry.
  • KEEP ON HAND PHONE NUMBERS of emergency resources, such as family members, friends, and a 24 hour hotline.
  • PINPOINT DANGEROUS SITUATIONS and locations in which you might be especially vulnerable to relationship violence, for example, driving home after a party. Think through various safety action plans for such situations. Another example, fights in kitchen, keep knifes or other potential weapons out of reach and not accessible.

Call NOW for help:

  • National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or 1-800-787-3224 (TTY)
  • NM Coalition Against Violence Sate-wide Hotline: 1-800-773-3645
  • Torrance County Domestic Violence Office:
  • Torrance County Sheriffs:
  • Sanctuary Zone:

IS YOUR RELATIONSHIP SAFE?

With the holidays arriving stress levels will be high and outbursts of emotions will be quicker. Which this all equates to a higher chance of abuse. Many victims in an intimate relationship don’t even recognize they are being abused. You or someone you know may rationalize this abusive behavior as just “going through a hard time”, “I shouldn’t make him so jealous by talking with his friends”, or “I just need to be patient and love him/her more and they will change”. Do any of these excuses sound familiar? This is all apart of the cycle of violence in abusive relationships.

Are you minimizing or denying a serious problem? Let’s assess your relationship:

You know you’re in trouble when you’re:

  • Afraid of your partners explosive temper
  • Being hit kicked, choked, or shoved. Have had objects thrown at you.
  • Being subjected to verbal abuse, name calling, or constant criticism.
  • Being threatened with violence towards yourself or someone else, or suicide.
  • Being watched, followed, checked-up on, stalked or called constantly.
  • Becoming isolated from friends and family.
  • Restricted by your partner’s excessive jealousy and possessiveness.
  • Afraid of saying no to sex.

***If any one of the above is true about your relationship, and especially if more than three are true, you need to get help now!

It’s not over when it’s over.

  • A victims risk increases tremendously when they decide to leave. Leaving is only the 1st step to healing.
  • Resist the pressure. Victims may still fear for their lives yet may feel extreme pressure to go back. Keep and look at photos of your injuries, this will help remind you what you escaped. Use the 24 hour hotlines.
  • Get counseling.
  • Build your support system
  • Avoid phone contact. Change your number, screen calls by letting the machine pick it up, use a pager or cell phone. Save messages of harassment or threats. Unplug the phones at night once everyone is home.
  • Change locks and/or install alarms.
  • Keep friends or families aware of your coming and goings at all times.
  • Get a restraining order (order of protection).
  • Join a support group.
  • Relocate or seek refuge. Shelters provide safety and confidentiality as well as counseling, support, referrals, and can help with all aspects of the process of becoming empowered and safe.

Let’s give the greatest gift to our family, friends, and self : SAFETY AND PEACE.